The Top 5 Things To Do In Indonesia

Things to do in Indonesia, dive Raja Ampat

Photo by Jonathan Chase via CC

Top 5 Things To Do In Indonesia

 

Made up of over 14,000 islands, the world’s largest archipelago extends from the tip of Southeast Asia to just off the coast of Australia. The country crosses three time zones and offers an incredible variety of landscapes, cultures, and traditions along the way. As a result, there are a million different places to go and things to do in Indonesia.

 

Most people traveling to Indonesia fly into Jakarta, the capital of both the country and the island of Java.  Java, the world’s most populous island, offers endless plains filled with smoking volcanoes, temples, charming towns, and bustling markets. Bali, another popular tourist destination, is beloved by sun- and surf -seekers, with a uniquely distinctive indigenous culture and laid-back vibe.

 

But for this story we want to move beyond the well-trod Bali/Java path and showcase some of the country’s best ecotourism attractions, from Sumatra to West Papua. You’d need several months (or several shorter trips) to explore the country in-depth, but these are a few of our favorite things to do in Indonesia:

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The Philippine Island of Danjugan, an Idyllic Ecotourism Escape

Philippine Island of Danjugan - Crystal Clear water

The Philippine Island of Danjugan:

An Idyllic Ecotourism Escape

 

On the Philippine Island of Danjugan, nature is fragile. Danjugan, a nature sanctuary, is part of an archipelago of 7107 islands that offers an incredible variety of landscapes and biodiversity.

 

At the same time, the region is often whipped by cyclones, drowned by floods, and rocked by earthquakes. And that’s not to mention the damage caused by human beings. Stories about polluted waterways and reckless deforestation in Palawan have recently made international headlines.

 

A journey through the Philippines can be a journey of environmental ups and downs, from pristine beaches to filthy rivers, from animal abuse to successful conservation projects. We managed to visit five very different islands, where we had some of the most memorable nature and wildlife experiences of our traveling lives. We dived with sea turtles near Apo Island, met the tarsiers of Bohol, and saw the thresher sharks of Malapascua circle the abyss at sunrise.

 

We also noticed the darker side of tourist development. We saw wildlife put on display for tourists in terrible conditions. We saw dive sites overcrowded with inexperienced divers, who damage the reef day after day. Families live in shacks right next to luxurious hotels and resorts.

 

Luckily, there are some success stories. In the case of Danjugan, it’s an uplifting story about  nature-loving individuals that decided to making saving this small Philippine Island their entire life’s mission.

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INTERVIEW: How Fires in Indonesia & Palm Oil Are Killing Orangutans

Bornean Orangutans photo via WWF

How Fires in Indonesia & Palm Oil Are Killing Orangutans

An Interview with International Animal Rescue’s Karmele Sanchez

 

Indonesia is burning.

 

In what The Guardian calls “the worst manmade environmental disaster since the BP gulf oil spill,” vast swaths of vital forests in Borneo and Sumatra are being consumed by fire. These fires were intentionally set by palm oil and paper companies, simply because slash & burn agriculture is the cheapest, fastest way to clear land for plantations.

 

But these fires in Indonesia– tens of thousands of them– are raging out of control due to record drought throughout the region. In places like Pematang Gadung and Sungai Besar, where the forests are filled with orangutans and other endangered species, some animals have died from smoke inhalation, while others have been poached or abducted into the illegal wildlife trade. But a precious few are being rescued by non-profit organizations such as International Animal Rescue.

 

Fires in Indonesia orangutan rescue by International Animal Rescue

Orangutan rescued by IAR

 

But it’s not just animal life that’s endangered: The toxic haze from Indonesia’s fires has created a thick layer of smog over the entire country. The city of Palangkaraya has become one of the most polluted places on the planet, and locals are literally choking on the devastating effects of unchecked corporate greed. Experts believe the impact of carbon released from these burning peat forests on climate change will be catastrophic if something isn’t done soon.

 

“The problem with fire and smoke is absolutely dire,” says IAR communications manager Lis Key. “Orangutans are badly affected by the smoke. Some suffer upper respiratory tract infections, which can prove fatal. Some of the babies we’ve taken in recently have been suffering from dehydration and malnourishment through lack of food, as well as breathing problems from the polluted air.”

 

Last week IAR sent out a desperate plea for help drawing international attention to (and financial support for) their fire-fighting and orangutan rescue efforts. To get a boots-on-the-ground insider’s perspective on the struggle, we spoke to Karmele Llano Sanchez, Program Director of IAR’s Indonesian initiatives (Yayasan IAR Indonesia).

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THAILAND: Gibbon Conservation in Phuket

The Gibbon Project photo via WARF

The Gibbon Rehabilitation Project photo via WARF

 

Gibbon Conservation

in Phuket, Thailand

 

[The following is a guest post from Jo Karnaghan, Chief Frugalista at Frugal First Class Travel, a guide to saving money while traveling in style. You can follow Jo on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram. If you’re a travel blogger interested in guest posting on GGT, please email pitches to Editor-In-Chief Bret Love at [email protected]]   

 

When we take family vacations, we often go to a resort. We find it a great opportunity to relax and do as much or as little as we like.

 

While it’s always tempting to spend our days lounging on the beach or enjoying cocktails by the pool, we do make time to find some meaningful activities to engage in as well. But as our daughter gets older, finding fun activities that we all agree on can be more difficult.

 

On a recent trip to Phuket, Thailand, I knew that visits to Buddhist temples just weren’t going to do it for her.  But when we came across the Gibbon Rehabilitation Centre in the Khao Pra Thaew National Park, even our fickle tween was hooked.  Not only did we have an opportunity to see these amazing animals up close, but we learned a lot about the need for Gibbon conservation.

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PHOTO GALLERY: Tibetan Culture In Ladakh

Manali-Leh 5000m tea lady

Manali-Leh tea lady

Tibetan Culture In Ladakh

 

Ladakh lies in far north India, in the heart of the Himalaya. The name of the region means ‘land of high passes’, as it’s completely locked by mountains on all sides, and so it can only be reached by air, or via a grueling trip across passes over 5000 meters over sea level.

 

Ladakh occupies the western half of the Tibetan plateau; its history, language and culture are closely related to Tibet. As such, Ladakh is one of the best places in the world to experience and get to know Tibetan culture, especially in summer when beautiful, colorful festivals take place in monasteries.

 

However, the future of Ladakh may be bleak. Ladakh is a high-altitude desert, with only 100 mm of rainfall every year. Global warming brought increased rainfall in the region – during the night of August 6th 2010, a year’s worth of rainfall fell in under an hour, triggering mudslides and flash floods that killed over 300 people.

 
We were in Ladakh that night. This photo story is a tribute to this beautiful land, and to all people that lost their life.

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